Showing 1–9 of 9 books

  • Author: Jacqueline Woodson
  • After Tupac and D Foster

    D Foster walks into the neighborhood where the narrator and her best friend Neeka live and opens up a whole new world to them, with Tupac's musical influence as a background. Susan Spain's narration brings the girls' intertwined stories to life as she conveys the emotional turmoil that is part of growing up.
  • Beneath a Meth Moon

    Laurel's heartbreak triggers her downward spiral into destruction.
  • From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun

    Fourteen-year-old Melanin Sun's comfortable, quiet life is shattered when his mother reveals she has fallen in love with a woman. Woodson's sensitive and lyrical books reveal and give a voice to outsiders often invisible to mainstream America.
  • The House You Pass On The Way

    When Staggerlee meets Trout she begins to question what she thought she knew about herself.
  • I Hadn't Meant to Tell You This

    Twelve-year-old Marie, the only black girl in the eighth grade willing to befriend her white classmate Lena, discovers that Lena's father is doing horrible things to her in private. Woodson's sensitive and lyrical books reveal and give a voice to outsiders often invisible to mainstream America.
  • If You Come Softly

    After meeting at their private school in New York, fifteen-year-old Jeremiah, who is black, and Ellie, who is white, fall in love and then try to cope with people's reactions. Woodson's sensitive and lyrical books reveal and give a voice to outsiders often invisible to mainstream America.
  • Lena

    Thirteen-year-old Lena and her younger sister Dion mourn the death of their mother as they hitchhike from Ohio to Kentucky while running away from their abusive father. Woodson's sensitive and lyrical books reveal and give a voice to outsiders often invisible to mainstream America.
  • Miracle's Boys

    Twelve-year-old Lafayette's close relationship with his older brother Charlie changes after Charlie is released from a detention home and blames Lafayette for the death of their mother. Woodson's sensitive and lyrical books reveal and give a voice to outsiders often invisible to mainstream America.
  • Peace, Locomotion

    Through Dion Graham's heartfelt performance, Lonnie Collins shares hopes for peace in letters to his beloved sister, heightening the lyrical narrative of Jacqueline Woodson's story.