Showing 1–6 of 6 books

  • Author: Jim Murphy
  • An American Plague: The True Terrifying Story of the Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1793

    It's 1793, and there's an invisible killer roaming the streets of Philadelphia. The city's residents are fleeing in fear. This killer has a name--yellow fever--but everything else about it is a mystery. Murphy's well-researched books bring history alive through multiple narratives involving young people.
  • Blizzard! The Storm That Changed America

    Presents a history, based on personal accounts and newspaper articles, of the massive snow storm that hit the Northeast in 1888. Murphy's well-researched books bring history alive through multiple narratives involving young people.
  • The Great Fire

    By weaving personal accounts of actual survivors together with the carefully researched history of Chicago and the disaster,Murphy recreates the events and reveals how, even in a time of deepest despair, the human spirit triumphed. Murphy's well-researched books bring history alive through multiple narratives involving young people.
  • Invincible Microbe: Tuberculosis and the Never-Ending Search for a Cure

    Starting in prehistoric times and continuing to today this book traces the history and biology of tuberculosis. In addition to being a medical history of the disease and the continuing search for a cure, it seamlessly weaves in the social history of the TB and its victims.
  • The Long Road to Gettysburg; A Young Patriot: The American Revolution as Experienced by One Boy

    Describes the events of the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863 as seen through the eyes of two actual participants, nineteen-year-old Confederate lieutenant John Dooley and seventeen-year-old Union soldier Thomas Galway. Murphy's well-researched books bring history alive through multiple narratives involving young people.
  • Truce

    Bored and miserable after months in the trenches along Europe"s Western Front during WWI, German and Allied soldiers brought fighting to a halt to celebrate Christman together in 1914.