Showing 1–7 of 7 books

  • List: Great Graphic Novels for Teens
  • Award year: 2018
  • Genre: Graphic Novel
  • Becoming Unbecoming

    It's 1977 and Una is 12. Other kids are into punk or ska, but Una is learning to play "Mull of Kintyre" by Wings on the guitar, and she thinks it's a really good song. There's another song, chanted on the terraces by Leeds United fans. It might not have made it on to Top of the Pops, but the boys all sing it on the walk home from school: "One Yorkshire Ripper . . . There's only one Yorkshire Ripper . . . One Yorkshire Ri-pper . . ." A serial murderer is at large in West Yorkshire and the police—despite spending more than two million man-hours hunting the killer and interviewing the man himself no less than nine times—are struggling to solve the case. As this national news story unfolds around her, Una finds herself on the receiving end of a series of violent acts for which she feels she is to blame. Unbecoming explores gender violence, blame, shame, and social responsibility. Through image and text Una asks what it means to grow up in a culture where male violence goes unpunished and unquestioned. With the benefit of hindsight Una explores her experience, wonders if anything has really changed and challenges a global culture that demands that the victims of violence pay its cost.
  • Hawking

    Tells the story of Stephen Hawking's life, focusing on his career in science.
  • Ignited, Volume 1.

    The lives of six teenagers are changed when a shooter targets their high school. Now the power to restore order is literally in their hands. So many friends and colleagues were lost, and some of those who survived underwent changes—they IGNITED, gaining supernatural abilities they barely understand. How will they use their powers to stand up for their fellow students as parents and teachers argue over the appropriate response to this tragedy?
  • Ladycastle

    When the King and all the men of the castle die, it's time for the women to knight up. When King Mancastle and his mighty vassals ride off on a crusade, the women left behind are not at all put out—that's a lot less armor polishing to do. Of course, when the men get themselves eaten by a dragon and leave a curse that attracts monsters to the castle . . . well, the women take umbrage with that. Now, Merinor, the blacksmith's wife is King, Princess Aeve is the Captain, and the only remaining (and least capable) knight, Sir Riddick, is tasked with teaching the ladies of the castle how to fight, defend, build, and do all manner of noisy things the men had done while the women assumed they were just drunk
  • Love: The Dinosaur

    Life can be a challenge when you're a small dinosaur trying to survive at the bottom of the food chain.
  • The One Hundred Nights of Hero

    In the Empire of Migdal Bavel, Cherry is married to Jerome, a wicked man who makes a diabolical wager with his friend Manfred: if Manfred can seduce Cherry in one hundred nights, he can have his castle--and Cherry. But what Jerome doesn't know is that Cherry is in love with her maid Hero. The two women hatch a plan: Hero, a member of the League of Secret Story Tellers, will distract Manfred by regaling him with a mesmerizing tale each night for 100 nights, keeping him at bay. Those tales are beautifully depicted here, touching on themes of love and betrayal and loyalty and madness. As intricate and richly imagined as the works of Chris Ware, and leavened with a dry wit that rivals Kate Beaton's in Hark! A Vagrant, Isabel Greenberg's One Hundred Nights of Hero will capture readers' hearts and minds, taking them through a magical medieval world.
  • Your Name, Volume 1

    When Mitsuha wished to escape her small mountain town she wasn't expecting it to land her in the body of Taki, a male high school student in Tokyo.