Showing 1–6 of 6 books

  • Genre: Fantasy
  • Author: Ursula K. Le Guin
  • The Beginning Place

    Hugh and Irena assummed that they had just stumbled upon Tembraebrezi, a beginning place, but Tembraebrezi has a secret dark fear that is threatening the kingdom. In her writing, as in her life, Ms. Le Guin takes on issues arising from the effort to live humanely in the natural world, exploring the tension between individuality and social norms.
  • The Farthest Shore

    A young prince joins forces with a master wizard on a journey to discover a cause and remedy for the loss of magic in Earthsea. In her writing, as in her life, Ms. Le Guin takes on issues arising from the effort to live humanely in the natural world, exploring the tension between individuality and social norms.
  • The Left Hand of Darkness

    A human emissary sent to the world of Winter to bring it into a galactic civilization must find a way to bridge the gulf between his outlook and that of the natives, who can change gender at will. In her writing, as in her life, Ms. Le Guin takes on issues arising from the effort to live humanely in the natural world, exploring the tension between individuality and social norms.
  • Tehanu

    When Sparrowhawk, the Archmage of Earthsea, returns from the dark land stripped of his magic powers, he finds refuge with the aging widow Tenar and a crippled girl child who carries an unknown destiny. In her writing, as in her life, Ms. Le Guin takes on issues arising from the effort to live humanely in the natural world, exploring the tension between individuality and social norms.
  • The Tombs of Atuan

    Arha's isolated existence as high priestess in the tombs of Atuan is jarred by a thief who seeks a special treasure. In her writing, as in her life, Ms. Le Guin takes on issues arising from the effort to live humanely in the natural world, exploring the tension between individuality and social norms.
  • A Wizard of Earthsea

    A boy grows to manhood while attempting to subdue the evil he unleashed on the world as an apprentice to the Master Wizard. In her writing, as in her life, Ms. Le Guin takes on issues arising from the effort to live humanely in the natural world, exploring the tension between individuality and social norms.